Age-structured non-pharmaceutical interventions for optimal control of COVID-19 epidemic (bibtex)
by Richard, Quentin; Alizon, Samuel; Choisy, Marc; Sofonea, Mircea T.; Djidjou-Demasse, Ramsès
Abstract:
Author summary COVID-19 infected individuals differ in the way they spread the infection depending on their age or on the number of days elapsed since the contamination. This individual heterogeneity can impact the design of public health control measures to contain epidemics. Using optimal control theory, we identify a strategy that minimizes deaths and costs due to the implementation of the control measures themselves. We also implement this strategy for three countries with contrasted age distributions (Burkina-Faso, France, and Vietnam). This strategy consists in rapidly intervening in older populations to protect the older people during the initial phase of the epidemic and (if the cost is intermediate or low) to control the epidemic, before progressively alleviating this control. Interventions in the younger population can occur later if the cost associated with the intervention is low. Such interventions targeted at younger people aim at suppressing the epidemic.
Reference:
Richard Q., Alizon S., Choisy M., Sofonea M. T. & Djidjou-Demasse R. (2021) Age-structured non-pharmaceutical interventions for optimal control of COVID-19 epidemic. PLoS Computational Biology. 17(3): e1008776.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{RichardEtal2021,
    author = {Richard, Quentin AND Alizon, Samuel AND Choisy, Marc AND Sofonea, Mircea T. AND Djidjou-Demasse, Ramsès},
    journal = {PLoS Computational Biology},
    title = {Age-structured non-pharmaceutical interventions for optimal control of COVID-19 epidemic},
    year = {2021},
    month = {3},
    volume = {17},
    pages = {e1008776},
    abstract = {Author summary COVID-19 infected individuals differ in the way they spread the infection depending on their age or on the number of days elapsed since the contamination. This individual heterogeneity can impact the design of public health control measures to contain epidemics. Using optimal control theory, we identify a strategy that minimizes deaths and costs due to the implementation of the control measures themselves. We also implement this strategy for three countries with contrasted age distributions (Burkina-Faso, France, and Vietnam). This strategy consists in rapidly intervening in older populations to protect the older people during the initial phase of the epidemic and (if the cost is intermediate or low) to control the epidemic, before progressively alleviating this control. Interventions in the younger population can occur later if the cost associated with the intervention is low. Such interventions targeted at younger people aim at suppressing the epidemic.},
    number = {3},
    doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1008776},
  Bdsk-url-1 = {https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1008776},
URL= {https://journals.plos.org/ploscompbiol/article/file?id=10.1371/journal.pcbi.1008776&type=printable}
}
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